Entries tagged “weekend reading”

The unbearable sadness of home Oct 12
There have been two instances in the past year where I have seriously questioned whether or not we chose the right neighbourhood in which to live.

Preparing for the fall. Sep 28
More than dates on a calendar, there are certain pieces of life that mark the end of the summer and the arrival of autumn.

The cicada’s dry monotony Sep 14
This past Monday, I was on the Micro Monday podcast talking about micro.blog, civility in online communities, and the massive potential of online spaces that are focused on building civic discourse rather than simply growth.

The violence of language Sep 07
Have you spent your whole life being told to ignore those who work hard to make sure you don’t matter?

Summer cold Aug 31
It took until the last day of August, but I have finally succumbed to the dreaded summer cold.

What’s in a name? Aug 19
One of the biggest honors—and responsibilities—I’ve had in my life was to lead the naming of my brother.

A moral imperative Aug 03
This is, after all, what I feel we should all be doing: making life better for those around us, and paying forward the grace we have received in our own journey through life.

I don’t say I love you as often as I should. Jul 20
When was the last time you told someone that you love them? Not a family member or a partner, but someone you work with, or a friend?

Fireflies in the garden Jul 06
Unlike stars, who remain fixed in the sky as I float in the pool in the middle of the night, the lights of the fireflies are fleeting, transient.

Sunday puzzle Jun 27
We have taken to completing the crossword puzzle on Sunday evenings.

Where to find more? Jun 15
Without a stream of links, shared by friends, appearing constantly on the phone screen, where do people find things to read and explore?

A place where we belong May 25
Making people feel like they belong is one of the most important things we can do, in no matter what context.

Go back to your country May 11
If I had a camera with me every time I was told to go back to my country, I’d have enough footage for a very long feature film.

Thinking about sunk costs Apr 20
Because of the sunk cost fallacy, too many of us sit through movies we don’t enjoy, complete reading books we find uninteresting, finish eating meals we find the opposite of delicious.

Not so young anymore Mar 31
The transition from “young and excited public servant” to “mid-career public servant who tries to empower, enable, and mentor young and excited public servants” happens slowly, then all at once.

I am just so tired Mar 16
Next week, perhaps I won’t be so gosh darn tired. Until then, forgive me for sleepwalking through the day.

Staring at the cosmic canvas Mar 02
I’m lucky to live in a part of town where I can see stars every night from our window.

Tomorrow feels like a day of quiet Feb 22
Tomorrow, I will reflect on what it means to be thirty-six years old, and think about what I’d like my next thirty-six to look like.

Maybe I haven’t gotten wiser as I’ve gotten older Feb 09
Maybe I haven’t gotten wiser as I’ve gotten older, but instead I’ve just found new spaces in which to exist.

Finding the right place, becoming a regular Jan 26
Being a regular is a wonderful feeling: finding an external space where you can be you, your whole self, and be recognized and relished for that, is liberating.

Public transportation is more than just getting to a destination Jan 19
In light of the new investment by the provincial government in London’s proposed new rapid transit system, I’ve been reflecting upon how the transit systems have shaped my favourite cities in the world.

It’s easy to complain about the cold Jan 05
It’s easy to complain about the cold: talking about the weather, especially extreme weather, makes conversation less awkward, more relatable.

At the end of the year, we slow down Dec 22
It snowed in North Vancouver this week, reminding us that perhaps it was the time of the year to slow down, just a little.

We were never really welcome. Dec 08
The travel ban reminds us that exclusion is not new to America, and that in the end, we never really were welcome here at all.

Leaders who shape us Nov 24
However you define leadership, it’s clear that good leaders possess a je ne sais quoi that is often elusive.

A new editor-in-chief, elation, and representation Nov 16
The decision to replace Graydon Carter with Radhika Jones at Vanity Fair is a momentous for many reasons, but minority representation in arts leadership is the reason that stands out most to me.

Learning about building better teams. Nov 03
I’ve been thinking a lot about building diverse and inclusive teams. I don’t have all the answers, but I am convinced that we all can be doing better than we are right now, no matter how far ahead we may think we may be.

Going for a jog. Oct 19
What motivates people to put on special shoes early in the morning on a cold day just to run in a circle and come home again?

Changing times. Oct 13
Starting the work day at 5:30am may be unpleasant, but having afternoons free for exploration is delightful.

Mental illness and its intersections. Oct 06
Here’s what I know: my experience with mental illness is a privileged one.

Back on my medication. Sep 26
After almost a decade without them, I have recently gone back on my medications to treat depression.

These days, I don’t understand. Sep 13
As I’ve grown older, the world seems a lot more perplexing to me. Things that seem so evident, so obvious to me are often seen in the completely opposite way by others.

Timing. Sep 07
I’m in the process of drafting some essays to share here, but in the meantime, here are some things I’ve been reading recently.

Weekend processing. Mar 10
I’ve learned an important truth about myself over the past few years: I need time to process.

Vacation reading. Feb 20
We returned from our vacation to Barbados late last night, and have spent the day unpacking, doing laundry, and getting settled back into our regular routine.